Crown Large Format Through-The-Window San Francisco Sunset Chinatown

Crown Large Format Through-The-Window San Francisco Sunset Chinatown

Technical considerations are definitely important. Sweating the details is what will make the difference between OK and wow. But there is always a time to stop being squeamish and just shoot!

The above is an example.

I saw this scene and barely had time to run and set up the equipment against a not-entirely-clean window. Shooting through windows is not normally a great idea but just look! This was not a scene to miss by obsessing on perfection.

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Time to Roll

Time to Roll

Improvisation.

Sometimes you just need a tripod and don’t have one. Other times you need two tripods and you only have one. This photo relates to the former. I am currently experiencing the latter.

Here’s the thing. Are you going to let life stop you just because you don’t have an 800WS monolight, or an 85mm f1.4 lens, or the latest super camera body? Good tools can certainly make the work easier and give better results than poor ones when skillfully and artfully used but even bad tools are better than no tools and you may be surprised at what you can build for yourself if you think through your exact requirements.

As I write this I am timing an eight minute exposure. I’ve taken a few frames tonight with the Crown and I like the way it looks out there on the balcony with the lights behind but, of course, it only looks like that on its tripod. What is the Retinette supposed to stand on to get the right angle? Why, my makeshift tripod. Here’s the bill of materials:

  1. One Polaroid back for a large format camera
  2. One TV remote control
  3. One camera bag for a large format camera
  4. One chair (stood on end) from inside the hotel room
  5. One outside chair (already on balcony)

To assemble, simply stack all of the parts with the highest number at the bottom and the camera resting on top.

Now this is certainly not the finest tripod known to man. In fact, I won’t be surprised if I later find out that it shifted at some time during those eight minutes and ruined my shot. However, neither was the roof of someone’s Jeep a perfect tripod either. But without it, I would not have the picture you see above. If you later see the picture I made tonight then you might want to remember this emergency tripod recipe!

Postscript: it worked! The result is here:

Retinette San Francisco Crown Graphic on Station

Najma Area Construction II

Najma Area Construction II

Ah, the magic of urban long exposures!

As I sit here in my San Francisco hotel room I really need to get to bed but the travel half way around the world seems to have whacked my body clock. So I’m exposing.

I made a very conscious decision on this trip that I didn’t want to be wasting my time getting sucked into “tourist snapping”. No digital, no 35mm SLR. I took only the Crown Graphic to force myself to be selective and not be tempted into any “casual” photography.

Large format is not casual.

However, I did want something carryable so I also took along my Grandfather’s old tourist camera from the 1950s — his Kodak Retinette. No exposure meter, no rangefinder for focus. Just a peephole for framing.

It is so freeing.

I’ve just taken two shots off the balcony at f11 and two minutes. Well, two minutes felt right. That should be about EV0. Assuming that there is iso100 film loaded in that camera. I’m actually not sure. Just did this last one about four minutes twenty. It should fill in the shadows a little more.

Now I’m off to try to sleep. I won’t see anything that I’ve taken until I get back. Maybe even some time after I get back depending how busy I am. I know I’ll have some thick tasty negatives to work with at some point. And that is good enough for me.

I’m free.

Space Gerkin Night

Space Gerkin Night

Happy New Year, interwebs!

God only knows what the new year has in store but I believe there are great things afoot. I see the coming year as the year I get truly serious about my craft. More large format work, more passionate portraits, more effort in “seeing” before and after the shutter is pressed. More work actually printed large and hung on walls.

Where are you at? Are all your family photos on Facebook and your iPhoto? Didn’t you love your old paper family photo album? Shouldn’t you have some real memorable portraits done? Do you craft? Do you make or collect things? Photos are memories. Good photos are good memories.

This year I finally got my family nailed down for a family portrait on the Corniche. It was not easy to organise but to me it was important.

Family Portrait Corniche III Revisited

When I first got the Crown Graphic this summer I knew I needed a picture of it.

Crown Graphic In Natural Habitat Coolscan

I have been fortunate enough to attend the Classic Car Club meetings in Doha with my 1971 Trans Am (the pictured car is not mine, it is a 1980 Turbo Trans Am). It is a unique event with unique cars and wonderful people. Again, I knew I needed some decent pictures.

Large Format Turbo Trans Am

I say all of this lest you say to me, “Doctor, heal thy self!”

Give me an email or a phone call. Let’s make some memories!

Forest Dream II

Forest Dream II

Black and White

I grew up in Alaska and I knew the name of one photographer. The name everyone knew. Ansel Adams. I love his work and the power that it evokes. I love the way black and white focuses you in on the essentials in a picture. And yet, I can hardly bear to shoot any.

I love colour. The bolder the better. The richer the better. I don’t like colour to look too unnatural but I just love amazing colour. When nature presents amazing colour it is that amazing colour I want to capture!

This is a shot I took when I first got my large format camera. The shop I bought it from only had black and white film in stock. I like it. I like it for all the reasons mentioned above. But I’m not sure I can bring myself to do it again…